Posts Tagged ‘ south africa ’

Sachin Tendulkar retired from ODI–Good Bye God

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When I retire is something I will decide because when I started it was not decided by someone else. Those who are advising me about retirement did not bring me into the team. I get my strength from my coaches and family.

Sachin Tendulkar’s decision to retire from ODIs was taken over the “last 72 hours,” though he formally informed the BCCI only last night.

According to sources close to the cricketer, BCCI president N Srinivasan was informed only last night.

“Once he was back in Mumbai after the Nagpur Test, he switched off his phone and became incommunicado for at least three days. The only possible way to contact him was through Anjali’s (wife) number as he wanted some time to himself,” a very close friend of Tendulkar said.

“By Friday night, he had intimated his family and close friends that he wants to quit ODIs. Accordingly, he informed BCCI president N Srinivasan last night about his decision, making it clear that he doesn’t want to play against Pakistan,” the source added.

There are strong indications that Tendulkar would start his preparations for the four-match Test series against Australia by playing in Mumbai’s final Ranji Trophy league game against Gujarat, in Mumbai from December 29-January 1.

Asked about retirement from Tests, the source added, “Any decision on that will only be taken after his performance against Australia. The four-Test series will make it 198 Tests for Sachin and if he does well, he might just think of going to South Africa to complete 200 Tests.”

Earlier, BCCI secretary Sanjay Jagdale said, “It was not sudden. He informed us before the selection about his decision. He spoke to me and the president about his decision.”

BCCI chief administrative officer Ratnakar Shetty added, “What he has expressed is his concern that India has to prepare for the next World Cup. From that point of view, he felt that it was time that he retired.”

India win T20 World Cup for Blind

India against Pakistan, in the final of the inaugural Twenty20 World Cup. No, we’re not talking Johannesburg 2007, but Bangalore 2012. This time, it was the inaugural T20 World Cup for the Blind, which India took by 29 runs.

The 12-day tournament, comprising nine teams, signed-off with much fanfare. There was India’s national broadcaster, Doordarshan, on hand to telecast the match. There were cheerleaders and the customary T20 bugle call being blasted over the PA. There were radio jockeys with boundary-side updates, and there were local actors to add a dash of glamour and get the crowd going. And, most vitally, there was a crowd to get going. A crowd that numbered around 4000.

“I don’t think I’ll ever experience anything like this in my life again,” South Africa’s visually-impaired cricket team captain, Desigan Pillay, said, as the spectators launched into a chant. His team-mate, Hendrik Christiaan, backed him up: “Back home, your wife thinks you’re great. And, probably, your mum. But to see so many people here, creating such an atmosphere, it’s very encouraging.”

Batting first on a Central College ground with a patchy outfield, India got to 258 for 8 – not a very intimidating total by blind cricket standards. At one point though, it looked like they might get much less. Enter Ketanbhai Patel, one of the four fully blind or B1 players in the XI (among the partially-sighted players, four are B2s – players who can see up to three metres – and the remaining three are B3s or those who can see up to six metres). As per the rules, B1 players have their scores doubled and so, when they click, they can make a huge difference for their team. Today, Ketanbhai clicked. He scored 98 off 43 balls, caught and bowled two short of a rare B1 century.

Pakistan came into the final unbeaten, and are the only team to make it to the finals of all four global blind cricket tournaments to date – this one, and the three 40-overs World Cups before this. They won two of those titles, the most recent being a victory over India in Islamabad in 2006. This time round, though, the very vocal home crowd wasn’t behind them and the pressure seemed to get to Pakistan. They lost wickets in a hurry and the run outs in the innings showed that they were nervous.

By the time the final over began, the game was over and the Indian fans knew it. Most left the shade of theshamiyanas (tents) surrounding the field, and crowded the boundary boards. The moment the final ball was bowled, and the 29-run win official, they spilled on to the field despite the best efforts of the volunteers and the police. Photographers with cameras flashing, schoolchildren draped with flags, physically challenged in wheelchairs … they were all out there. Some sprayed bottled coke on others, while the crackers went off in the background.

Over the next hour, the Indian visually-impaired team was hugged and hoisted on shoulders and raucously celebrated. After the speeches – several of them – mementos were handed out to all the teams by former Sri Lanka captain Arjuna Ranatunga and former India wicketkeeper Syed Kirmani, among others. The star player of the tournament, India batsman Prakash Jairamaiah, was garlanded and India captain Shekhar Naik was handed the trophy. Of course, there were a few well-deserved cheques handed out too.

Ricky Ponting to retire after Perth Test

One of Australia’s greatest ever batsmen, Ricky Ponting, will retire after the Perth Test against South Africa. The 37-year-old officially announced this afternoon that he will step aside following his 168th Test, at the WACA starting tomorrow.

The Tasmanian has compiled an astonishing record, scoring 13,366 Test runs at an average of 52.21. But he felt his performances weren’t good enough to earn a spot in the team.

A glorious career will come to an end. Reuters“This is a decision not made by the selectors, it was made by me,” Cricket Australia tweeted Ponting as saying. “I haven’t been performing consistently over the last 12-18 months. I believe now is the right time to be making this decision.

“I’ve given cricket my all.”

However, Ponting felt his inability to shine at the big moments helped him make up his mind.

“Thing that struck home was even though my preparation and feeling was good I was falling at the big moments. Based on performances on this series. Not good enough output for an Australian batsman,” said Ponting.

Ponting was dropped from the one-day team but has remained in the Test side as a specialist batsman with disappointing results. It will be his 168th Test for Australia, equalling Steve Waugh’s record as most Tests played by an Australian.

CA Chief Executive Officer James Sutherland said he and Ricky had exchanges messages earlier today after Ponting had made his decision overnight.

“Ricky has had an extra-ordinary career and has made an extra-ordinary contribution, including through the example he has set for other elite players and through the excitement he has given fans, young and old,” Mr Sutherland said.

“There is much to admire, including his pride in his roots at his local cricket club that he spoke so eloquently of at last month’s Bradman Oration, through to the fact that he takes to the field tomorrow for his 168th Test as one of the best prepared players in the modern game”.

“I think his record until he retired as captain was outstanding but my respect for him since then has actually increased, seeing first-hand how he stepped back to become a total team player, absolutely committed to his captain, unstinting in his work to help other players and single-minded in his view that everything, including his own ambition, must always be second place after whatever was best for the team”.

International Day of Non-Violence

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International Day of Non-Violence – 2nd October

On June 15, 2007, the United Nations General Assembly declared Oct. 2 of each year to be “International Day of Non-Violence” to commemorate the birthday of Mahatma Ghandi. Ghandi’s name is recognized around the world as synonymous with peace, and this day strives to further his philosophy through education and public awareness.

Most would agree that Mahatma Ghandi was a great and inspirational human being. Here are some interesting facts about his life that you may not have known:

* Ghandi spoke English with an Irish accent.

* Ghandi lived on a diet of fruit, goat’s milk and olive oil.

* Ghandi was heavily influenced by Henry David Thoreau, specifically when it came to his beliefs on Civil Disobedience.

* Ghandi never visited the U.S.

Mahatma Gandhi – The Father of the Nation

Gandhi Jayanti Celebration

Gandhi  Jayanti Celebration-2nd Octomber

Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi was born on 2 October 1869 at Porbandar in Gujarat. Gandhiji is called as Mahatma and Bapu by all Indians. He was officially honored as the Father of the Nation and his birthday is celebrated as Gandhi jayanti. The celebration and observance of the birthday of Mahatma Gandhi is to commemorate his sacrifices, morals and his teachings. His ethics and his principles on non-violence have become an inspiration of light for the world.

Mahatma Gandhi was a great leader. His tradition are still appreciated and commonly used for solving conflicts and finding nonviolent result to troubles. Some of the significant events used to take place every year although the festival is celebrated as a quiet affair. The following line makes to understand or comprehend to know all about celebrating Gandhi Jayanti.

Prayer meetings are held at Raj Ghat, New Delhi, and the memorial where Mahatma Gandhi was cremated. The Prime Minister and President of India attend a prayer services. Other dignitaries are also present. Everybody present pays their respect to the great leader. As Gandhi is respected by all the religions, various religious and political leaders they all will come and pay their tribute to Gandhi. Religious poetry and prayers from different holy books are also read out. Moreover, Gandhis favorite devotional song Raghupati Raghava Raja Ram is sung in the memory of the deceived.

On Gandhi Jayanti, all schools and offices are closed throughout the nation to celebrate the occasion. In most schools, the instance is celebrated by performing various works, such as planting new saplings, distributing medicines to the poor and needy, cleaning public areas and pledging to educate poor people. 2nd October has also been affirmed as the International Day of Non-Violence by the United Nations General Assembly on 15th June, 2007. Hence, on this day, liquor is neither sold nor consumed throughout India in Gandhijis honor. Some sincere followers of Gandhiji also refrain from consuming meat on this day.

On the day of Gandhi Jayanthi many of the colleges and communities used to arrange various competitions such as essay writing and painting. Many of these competitions were conducted on the regards of glorifying peace, violence and the teachings of the great Gandhi.