Posts Tagged ‘ United Nations ’

International Civil Aviation Day

civil

Today is International Civil Aviation Day

In 1996 the United Nations General Assembly proclaimed that 7 December was to be the International Civil Aviation Day.

The day had been celebrated by the International Civil Aviation Organization since 7 December 1994, the 50th anniversary of the signing the Convention on International Civil Aviation.

International Civil Aviation Day is observed to raise awareness of the importance of international civil aviation and the role that the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) plays in international air transport. The organization is a United Nations (UN) body responsible for developing international standards for aviation safety.

ICAO, with support from governments, organizations, businesses and individuals, actively promotes International Civil Aviation Day through various activities and events. This day is celebrated globally, especially in countries such as South Africa, through various activities such as seminars, published material, educational lectures, classroom activities, and news announcements on international civil aviation topics related to the day.

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International Day for the Abolition of Slavery 2012

Free The Slaves

Today, December 2nd, is the International Day for the Abolition of Slavery- marking the anniversary of the UN’s adoption of the United Nations Convention for the Suppression of the Traffic in Persons and of the Exploitation of the Prostitution of Others  in 1949.

This day calls for the awareness and eradication of modern-day slavery, including child labor, trafficking, sexual exploitation  forced marriage, and the use of children in armed conflict.

It also comes on the heels of the Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights, endorsed by the Human Rights Council earlier this year.

This implementation of the United Nations “Protect, Respect, and Remedy” framework provides businesses guiding principles on how to respect fundamental human rights.

“To eradicate contemporary forms of slavery, we need new strategies and measures that can unite all actors. While Governments bear the primary responsibility, the private sector has an integral role to play. Earlier this year, the Human Rights Council endorsed the Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights, outlining how states and businesses should implement the UN “Protect, Respect and Remedy” Framework. I welcome the widespread support it has received from the business sector,” said Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon in his Message for the International Day for the Abolition of Slavery.

International Day For The Elimination Of Violence Against Women

International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women

Every day, women and girls are subject to domestic violence, exploitation, sexual violence, trafficking, honour crimes, harmful traditional practices, such as bride burning and early marriages, and other forms of violence against their bodies, minds and human dignity.

As many as one in three women has been beaten, coerced into sex, or abused in some other way.

In the 16 days leading up to Human Rights Day and every day, let us come together to demand an end to the most pervasive yet least reported human rights abuse in the world.

Let us all take a stand and say loud and clear ‘No to violence against women’.

In this demand, we are joined by a new network of men leaders led by United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon as part of the United Nations UNite Campaign to end violence against girls and women. I welcome their leadership and commitment to actively engage men and boys in the cause to end impunity, promote justice and human rights, and end widespread violence against girls and women.

Whether they are policy makers, community or religious leaders, fathers or husbands, uncles, brothers or young boys, they can all do their part to eliminate all forms of violence against women.

I also welcome the recent Security Council resolutions 1888 and 1889 that strengthen accountability to women and girls in conflict and post-conflict situations. By condemning sexual violence, calling for a stronger role for women in peacebuilding, and mandating peacekeeping missions to protect women and girls, the resolutions signal a political commitment to address sexual violence as a peace and security issue.

All segments of society must unite for the dignity and well-being of women and girls. Now is the time to build a society based on respect for fundamental human rights and the equal rights of men and women.

International Day of Rural Women

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Women play a critical role in the rural economies of both developed and developing countries. In many parts of the world,
agriculture
is the first sector of employment for women, for instance in Sub-Saharan Africa and in South Asia, where respectively 68 per cent and 61 per cent of working women are employed in agriculture . Rural women, mainly farmers, are at least 1.6 billion and represent more than a quarter of the total world population. Women produce on average more than half of all the food that is grown: up to 80 per cent in Africa, 60 per cent in Asia, between 30 and 40 per cent in Latin America and Western countries. Women own only 2 per cent of the land, and receive only one per cent of all agricultural credit. Only 5 per cent of all agricultural extension resources are directed to women. Women represent two third of all illiterate people. The number of rural women living in poverty has doubled since 1970. The United Nations’ (UN) International Day of Rural Women  directs attention to both the contribution that women make in rural areas and the many challenges that they face. It also celebrates and honours the role of rural women on October 15 each year. It recognizes rural women’s importance in enhancing agricultural and rural development worldwide.

History -Day of Rural Women

The International Day of Rural Women was first celebrated as an official UN observance on October 15, 2008. This day recognizes the role of rural women, including indigenous women, in enhancing agricultural and rural development, improving food security and eradicating rural poverty. The idea of honouring rural women with a special day was put forward at the Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing, China, in 1995. It was suggested that October 15 be celebrated as “World Rural Women’s Day,” which is the eve of World Food Day, to highlight rural women’s role in food production and food security. “World Rural Women’s Day” was previously celebrated across the world for more than a decade before it was officially a UN observance.

Event-Day of Rural Women

Many people, government agencies, community groups and non-government associations celebrate the International Day of Rural Women on October 15 every year. Television, radio, online, and print media broadcast or publish special features to promote the day. Panel discussions, research papers, and conferences are also held to review and analyse rural women’s role in society, particularly in areas such as economic improvement and agricultural development.

Other activities and events include:

  • Global exchange programs for women in agriculture.
  • The launch of fund-raising projects to support rural women.
  • Expos and workshops showcasing rural women’s contribution to their societies.
  • Strategic meetings to present issues on topics, such as empowering women farmers, to policy makers.

International Day for Disaster Reduction

StepUP DataDiary

2012 International day for disaster reduction: Women and girls – the [in]Visible force of resilience!

INTERNATIONAL Day for Disaster Reduction (IDRR) is a celebration of how people reduce their risk to disasters and their effort to heighten public awareness about the importance of disaster risk reduction in contrast to reactive or
Disaster Risk Reduction
. More lives can be spared and damage to property can be better avoided through this strategy.

With the aim of highlighting the potential and significant partners in disaster risk reduction (DRR), a Step Up initiative was started in 2011 so that thereafter, each year would focus on a different group of partners leading up to the 2015 World Conference for Disaster Reduction. Last year, the focus was on children and young people; this year it is on women and girls; in 2013, the ageing population; and in 2014, people with disabilities. The theme of this year’s celebration is “Women and Girls: the [in]Visible Force of Resilience,” seeks to draw attention to the fact that their invaluable contribution to the protection and rebuilding of their communities are often unrecognized and their ability to contribute is hindered by lack of inclusion and poor understanding of gender inequality.

Women and girls are neither helpless nor passive; Philippine experience can attest to this. While they too fall victims to tragedies and disasters, they endeavor to transcend such state, and contribute what they can to respond to emergencies and address the immediate needs of family and community members. They are endowed with unique knowledge and skills that are crucial in managing disaster risks.

International Day for Disaster Risk Reduction was originally celebrated every second Wednesday of October by virtue of UN General Assembly Resolution 44/236 dated December 22, 1989. The Assembly, through Resolution 64/200, on December 21, 2009, later designated October 13 as the date to celebrate the IDDR.

We greet the United Nations International Strategy for Disaster Reduction led by UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon and UN Special Representative of the Secretary General for Disaster Risk Reduction Margareta Wahlstrom on the occasion of the 2012 International Day for Disaster Reduction.